Bill and Ted’s Excellent Reasons why Writers should Write More Reviews

In my last post (only a few hours ago I admit) I talked about my top rules for being a good reviewer (I also talked about watching Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure momentarily but now that I’ve moved on to Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey, I don’t know if I can justify returning to that line of enquiry…) I am now going to briefly talk about how that is making me a better a writer with a hope that some of you may decide to start reviewing.

A week ago, when I started reviewing, I had an agenda. Simple as that. I was reviewing other people’s work, sometimes two to three a day, in an attempt to convince others to give my own work a look over and review. Now, following my hard and fast rules that I discussed in my last post, I managed to not only get some experience of what other people are doing within specific genres, but I also managed to get the kind of reviews I was looking for my own work…

But that wasn’t the intention to begin with…

It all started a few weeks ago when I was randomly contacted by someone from Inkitt who suggested I might like to enter a competition. I ignored them for two reasons, first I was busy as hell and second I didn’t have anything to submit that fell into the genre they were after. So I left it at that and thought nothing more of it until they contacted me again a week or so ago suggesting another competition I might like.

This one was a crime/thriller exercise and, since I had been on the look out for a new audience to test my material on, I figured it would be an interesting opportunity. So I submitted a previously rejected work and watched…

As a result of entering the competition, several things happened that I did not expect:

  1. I got my confidence boost – I found that people not only liked my story, they loved it!
  2. I got helpful advice – I was getting feedback about little things that never crossed my mind but are now tattooed into my brain forever more
  3. I got experience of marketing my story…

Now the third one is the really interesting point. We live in the world where a lot of writers, for various reasons, decide to sell their work in ebook form online and most of us end up disappointed to a certain degree. Despite all the hard effort we put in to writing the thing, nobody wants to read it – not even our closest friends half the time! But here I was, with a free story available for people to read online and the ability to test strategies for how to market it…

And this brings me back to the point of my post. As writers we cannot get fans if no one reads our book. You’re family and friends may support you, but very few of those actually go out to read your work, even if you plonk it down right in front of them.

Bogus.

By reviewing other people’s work on sites like Inkitt, you not only get the benefit of having reviews returned to you, but you also get given opportunities to gain new fans – these people are reading your work and taking the time to write something about it. Yes, maybe they’ll do that and never think of it again, but maybe, just maybe, one of them will end up becoming a fan and tell their friends and contacts about you…

All because of one little review you wrote for them…dressed to deceive
My story, Dressed to Deceive, is still available to read here on Inkitt for free and is still part of the Fated Paradox competition. If you like what you’ve read here, please follow the below link, sign up for Inkitt and check it out for yourself. If you like it, click the little heart.

Party on Dudes!

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